UC Business School among 1% global elite with Triple Crown accreditation

Photo info: The UC Business School Trading Room simulates a real-world financial trading environment, providing business and finance students with experiential learning and skills in fund management.  Photo credit: University of Canterbury

Photo info: The UC Business School Trading Room simulates a real-world financial trading environment, providing business and finance students with experiential learning and skills in fund management.
Photo credit: University of Canterbury

The University of Canterbury (UC) Business School has achieved EFMD Quality Improvement System (EQUIS) accreditation.

EQUIS accreditation benchmarks against ten international standards; governance, programmes, students, faculty, research, internationalisation, ethics, responsibility, and sustainability, as well as engagement with the world of practice.

“The UC Business School has used the framework of EQUIS accreditation to strengthen its international focus, to build meaningful connections with business and community organisations, and to embed ethics and sustainability throughout its operations,” says Professor Sonia Mazey, Pro-Vice-Chancellor College of Business and Law.

This transformation has seen the School move from a regional focus to an internationally recognised Business School, producing high calibre graduates who are prepared for success within a global workforce, she says.

UC Vice-Chancellor Professor Cheryl de la Rey said the University was delighted with the result.

“Achieving EQUIS accreditation, and subsequently the Triple Crown of business school accreditation, acknowledges the international calibre of our teaching and research as well as the high quality of our staff and students,” she says. 

UC joins an elite group of international business schools with Triple Crown accreditation, placing it in the top 1% of business schools in the world. Triple Crown accreditation follows rigorous quality assessment processes by three accreditation systems: the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) based in the United States, the Association of MBAs (AMBA) based in the United Kingdom, which accredits the flagship MBA programme, and now EQUIS based in Europe. 

The Triple Crown accreditation follows years of focused work to ensure the School is achieving the highest standards.

The recognition is a milestone for the Business School, which is the only Triple Crown accredited university in the South Island, and one of only a handful in Australasia says Professor Paul Ballantine, Head of the UC Business School. 

“Accreditation is acknowledged worldwide and provides a seal of excellence for the whole Business School. More than ever, UC graduates can be confident that the qualifications they earn at UC are recognised by local employers and internationally and will open doors for them around the world.”

EQUIS accreditation is the most comprehensive institutional accreditation system for business and management schools. It is acknowledged worldwide by potential students, faculty, employers, corporate clients and the media.

-University of Canterbury

UC academic first woman elected international music society president

glendakeamUC (002).jpg

University of Canterbury (UC) Associate Professor Glenda Keam has been elected the first female President of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM).

Head of UC’s School of Music, Associate Professor Keam became the first woman and first New Zealander elected as ISCM President at this year’s general assembly in Estonia.

“In this new role I have the opportunity to meet a huge range of music leaders and performers,” she says.

“The connections raise the profile of the University and Aotearoa New Zealand, as both become better known by all member organisations. It puts us on the map of contemporary music practices and facilitates connections with composer organisations as well as other universities in such places as Texas and Beijing. It also enables access to expertise and opportunities for New Zealanders and for our students,” says Associate Professor Keam.

The ISCM was established in Austria in 1922, it has 50 member organisations and is “virtually a United Nations of the new music world”. Its annual festivals present music from its members performed by local musicians, and feature the music of the host country.

“It’s marvellous to be engaged in the music networks participating in the Society and it’s very healthy for Aotearoa New Zealand to be engaged with this organisation. Together we can share similar challenges, compare local issues, and explore ideas across different cultures,” she says.

Associate Professor Keam will be directing the ISCM’s World Music Day 2020 festival, to be held in both Auckland and Christchurch in April next year. The Christchurch dates overlap with the Asian Composers League festival, and the final concert of new music will feature the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra in the Christchurch Town hall.

“Contemporary art music is music of ‘now’ and is fresh and exploratory – not yet tried and true. The musical world has changed so much over the past 25 years with the digital revolution. Communication and sharing of music is virtually instantaneous now, so the commercial model for composers has changed, but live music is still the most powerful way to experience it.”

“I’m looking forward to leading the ISCM towards its centenary celebrations in three years, possibly to be held in South Africa. It’s an honour to help the ISCM membership evolve, and move into its next century with more global reach,” she says.

Associate Professor Keam’s compositions have been performed in New Zealand, United States and United Kingdom, and her PhD analytically examined New Zealand music. She was President of the Composers Association of New Zealand from 2007–2017 and earlier served four years as treasurer of the New Zealand Society for Music Education. She has been an enthusiastic chorister and enjoys performing as a piano improviser. At UC she is Head of Music, and lectures in analysis, composition, New Zealand music and music education.

-University of Canterbury

New era dawns at UC

Professor De la Rey - photo credit University of Canterbury

Professor De la Rey - photo credit University of Canterbury

The University of Canterbury’s 2018 results signal a new period of consolidation and growth, with a pleasing surplus, increased student numbers, newly opened learning facilities and buildings, and increased research revenue.

The University of Canterbury |Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha 2018 results signal a new period of consolidation and growth, with a pleasing surplus, increased student numbers, newly opened learning facilities and buildings, and increased research revenue.

The University’s audited result for the year ended 31 December 2018 coincides with the recent appointment of new Vice Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae Professor Cheryl de la Rey and Chancellor | Tumu Kaunihera Sue McCormack.

Professor De la Rey says she is pleased to see UC on a trajectory to success across all the areas of achievement expected from a world-class institution.

“We begin 2019 with vibrant student numbers, exciting new facilities for learning, internationally leading research and a pleasing balance sheet as well. It is very exciting to join the University at this time and to make my contribution to the wonderful work that has been done so far to deliver UC beyond recovery and very much into growth and further development.”

“The 2018 results are a credit to the University of Canterbury Council, Senior Management Team and every single staff member of our organisation,” Professor De la Rey says. “Thanks to my predecessor Dr Rod Carr and former Chancellor Dr John Wood for their effective leadership of the University.”

It was a year of highlights for the University. Prime Minister Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern opened Stage 1 of the $220 million Rutherford Regional Science and Innovation Centre – the Ernest Rutherford building, named for renowned UC alumnus Lord Rutherford. The building includes specialist teaching and research laboratories for Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, Geography and Biological Sciences. Construction of Stage 2 is well under way, the innovative multi-storey timber-framed building named for UC alumna and renowned astronomer Beatrice Tinsley.

The blessing of the new Rehua building, which opened for teaching in January 2019, marked another special moment in UC’s recovery. Rehua houses the College of Education, Health and Human Development | Te Rāngai Ako me te Hauora, the Centre for Entrepreneurship | Te Pokapū Rakahinonga and the Executive Development Programme of the College of Business and Law | Te Rāngai Umanga me te Ture. 

In 2018 UC recovered student numbers with 14,070 EFTS* overall (an increase of 7.5% on 2017), with increases across domestic, international and postgraduate students.  

Financially, the University achieved a $9.6 million surplus, compared to the 2017 deficit of $5.3m, and a budgeted operating deficit for 2018 of $7.9m. The surplus was buoyed by a one-off insurance payment for earthquake damage. The University also received the final $50m of support from the Crown, having achieved the necessary milestones and targets required. This post-earthquake support of up to $260m of the University’s building programme concluded in 2018. The University remains grateful for the assistance from the Crown and, through that support, its acknowledgement of the role UC plays in the city of Christchurch and the economy, as one of the region’s largest employers.

*Equivalent Full-time Students

-University of Canterbury

Is ‘sex ed’ failing the #metoo generation?

Kathleen Quinlivan

Kathleen Quinlivan

Navigating contemporary gender issues is complicated for young people, and New Zealand’s traditional sexuality education is not keeping up, according to a Canterbury education expert.

Gender fluidity, consent, exposure to pornography, sexual violence, and the power dynamics behind the #metoo movement are some of the issues University of Canterbury Associate Professor Kathleen Quinlivan explores in her new book Exploring Contemporary Issues in Sexuality Education with Young People (Palgrave).

“One of the main issues is this huge slippage between what young people need and what they are getting. We are in the era of #metoo, sexual harassment, sex and gender politics and those are things that young people really want to know about, but they are often not areas that teachers and parents are comfortable going into,” Assoc Prof Quinlivan says.

The internationally recognised researcher of school-based sexuality education says a limited health and risk focus of sexuality education lingers. That the word “pleasure” was removed from the most recent (2015) Ministry of Education sexuality education guidelines is typical of a cautious official approach, she says.  

Meanwhile, young people are taking matters in to their own hands, Assoc Prof Quinlivan says.

“There are feminist groups in schools and there are queer-straight alliance groups in schools that have strong social justice orientations, combatting discrimination and talking about pleasure – there are a lot of informal things happening that are not visible in the formal arena.”

The gaps can be bridged, she says. Assoc Prof Quinlivan advocates for teachers to listen to young people’s lived experiences and venture beyond traditional boundaries.

“It is not easy teaching these things. The Ministry of Education is risk averse and doesn’t provide support for professional development, plus the Sexuality Education guidelines are not compulsory – in fact schools didn’t even receive a hard copy of them,” she says. 

“Policies aside, the relationship with students is the most important thing for teachers to develop and that takes time. You have to be someone who is really interested in exploring the issues that young people are dealing with.”

The possibilities for change are exciting, she says.

“The rise of the #metoo movement has been huge – there has been a tidal shift. There is a new feminism where younger women are starting to stand up and talk about the things they experience. Through popular culture, in response to gender-based harassment, sexual diversity and the rise of #metoo, there is a renewed interest in gender activism – it is a bit of moment really!”

The book was launched in New Zealand on 20 February to coincide with a symposium for academics and teachers at UC’s College of Education, Health and Human Development, titled Coming In Slantways: Sexuality Education Otherwise. Presentations and workshops enabled participants to explore and expand their practice, bringing the fruits of research to both educators and their students.

Exploring Contemporary Issues in Sexuality Education with Young People  , by Kathleen Quinlivan, Palgrave Macmillan UK, ISBN 978-1-137-50104-2

Exploring Contemporary Issues in Sexuality Education with Young People, by Kathleen Quinlivan, Palgrave Macmillan UK, ISBN 978-1-137-50104-2

The book was launched in New Zealand on 20 February to coincide with a symposium for academics and teachers at UC’s College of Education, Health and Human Development, titled Coming In Slantways: Sexuality Education Otherwise. Presentations and workshops enabled participants to explore and expand their practice, bringing the fruits of research to both educators and their students.

-University of Canterbury

Physical activity environment and obesity risk

Dr Matthew Hobbs’ research could help policymakers consider the impact environmental interventions have on preventing obesity.

Dr Matthew Hobbs’ research could help policymakers consider the impact environmental interventions have on preventing obesity.

A new study from University of Canterbury (UC) shows a link between recreational physical activity spaces in a neighbourhood and obesity risk in adults.  

Dr Matthew Hobbs, a researcher at the University of Canterbury’s GeoHealth Laboratory, has published one of the first longitudinal studies, research about an individual or group gathered over a long period of time, which suggests age may be a determining factor when analysing the relationship between an individual’s recreational physical activity environment and obesity. A recreational physical activity environment included parks, gyms, swimming pools, even ice rinks.  

The study was conducted in Yorkshire, United Kingdom, and tracked 8,864 people over three years. At its conclusion, it illustrated that if a young adult’s recreational physical activity environment provided opportunities to be physically active, risk of obesity was lower, however this relationship did not exist for older adults.  

“It is difficult to envisage a future where obesity prevalence decreases in environments that actively promote it,” Dr Hobbs says.  

“Our study showed that the recreational physical activity environments was related to obesity risk, but only in younger adults. An individual’s mobility varies with age and older adults are generally less mobile. While many factors affect mobility, it is plausible that the immediate residential neighbourhood environment may play a more important role in an individual’s daily life who remains closer to home.”  

According to Dr Hobbs, age has not previously been identified as a determining factor in this type of research.  

“The research is especially important for policymakers, as it offers tentative evidence that supports previous research which suggests that the environment may matter more for certain populations. This suggests that policymakers in Public Health and Planning need to consider the impact that environmental interventions have across the life course,” he says. 

“Obesity is associated with a range of diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and some cancers, so finding ways to stop people becoming obese is important for public health and for the public purse.”

-University of Canterbury